Effects of the Sleep SAAF responsive parenting intervention on rapid infant weight gain: A randomized clinical trial of African American families

Justin A. Lavner, Jennifer S. Savage, Brian K. Stansfield, Steven R.H. Beach, Michele E. Marini, Jessica J. Smith, Megan C. Sperr, Tracy N. Anderson, Erika Hernandez, Amy M. Moore, Alice Little Caldwell, Leann L. Birch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Responsive parenting (RP) interventions reduce rapid infant weight gain but their effect for underserved populations is largely unknown. The Sleep SAAF (Strong African American Families) study is a two-arm randomized clinical trial for primiparous African American mother-infant dyads that compares an RP intervention to a child safety control over the first 16 weeks postpartum. Here we report on intervention effects on rapid infant weight gain and study implementation. Families were recruited from a mother/baby nursery shortly after delivery. Community Research Associates (CRAs) conducted intervention home visits at 3 and 8 weeks postpartum, and data collection home visits at 1, 8, and 16 weeks postpartum. To examine rapid infant weight gain, conditional weight gain (CWG) from 3 to 16 weeks, the primary outcome, and upward crossing of 2 major weight-for-age percentile lines were calculated. Among the 212 mother-infant dyads randomized, 194 completed the trial (92% retention). Randomized mothers averaged 22.7 years, 10% were married, and 49% participated in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). Adjusting for covariates, mean CWG was lower among RP infants (0.04, 95% CI [-0.33, 0.40]) than among control infants (0.28, 95% CI [-0.08, 0.64]), reflecting non-significantly slower weight gain (p = 0.15, effect size d = 0.24). RP infants were nearly half as likely to experience upward crossing of 2 major weight-for-age percentile lines (14.1%) compared to control infants (24.2%), p = 0.09, odds ratio = 0.52 (95% CI [0.24, 1.12]). Implementation data revealed that participating families were engaged in the intervention visits and intervention facilitators demonstrated high fidelity to intervention materials. Findings show that RP interventions can be successfully implemented among African American families while suggesting the need for modifications to yield stronger effects on infant weight outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number106080
JournalAppetite
Volume175
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2022

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Childhood obesity
  • Infancy
  • Prevention
  • Rapid weight gain
  • Responsive parenting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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